How Dick and Jane Died / by Christopher Stewart

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Ted_Geisel_NYWTS_2_crop Sometimes you think you know an author, but you don't. Take Theodore Geisel for example. In 1925 while a student at Dartmouth he was stripped of a position as editor at the college's humor publication after he was caught drinking in his dorm.

His response?

He continued writing but copped a pen name. Dr. Seuss. Maybe you've heard of him?

With so many sing-songy children's books in his collection we might not see the deeper artistry in his work, which includes touching on themes that are downright provocative. From the 1950's onward Dr. Seuss addressed discrimination, Fascism, and war mongering in books you may have read without detecting the message.

Of his eternally famous book The Cat In The Hat he said: “It’s the book I’m proudest of because it had something to do with the death of the Dick and Jane primers.”

For more, read the full article "Impertinent Questions with Philip Nel" at Humanities Magazine."